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Thread: Bug out radio

  1. #21
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    They're going through a server migration so bear with em

  2. #22
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    If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask here. We do still consider www.preparedham.com our "comms section", but we also have a lot of old tube benders here that can answer most questions.
    I'm so awesome that my doctor gave me a special jacket so that I can hug myself.

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by junior125 View Post
    They're going through a server migration so bear with em
    Been a member over there for a while but not active. Yes they are going through a server migration so may be spotty for a bit.

  4. #24
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    For a bugout transceiver something like this might be useful http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Produc...uctid=MFJ-9440 One will be hard pressed to find a cheaper HF transiever but you would be limited to one band and no digital tuning. I'm sure there would be a learning curve to operating it...something like this will not be plug and play. In my home station I run a Yaesu FT-990 with the MARS mod so I have the ability to transmit from the high end of the AM broadcast band up to the 10 meter band. It also makes a dandy shortwave receiver. It is 12v but too big and heavy to be considered a bugout radio.

  5. #25
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    I have an Elecraft KX 3 which covers everything from the 160m to 6m, weighs a little over a pound and can TX & Rc SSB, CW, AM, FM and yes it has a learning curve on which I've only started. Power is 10W unless plugged in (AC or battery pack) then it's 15W. It can be hooked up to a 100W amplifier but now you are talking mostly a static use.

  6. #26
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    I think that what pretty much every ham operator out there is going to tell you is that any radio that you get will have a learning curve, so learn to use it before you have to.
    I'm so awesome that my doctor gave me a special jacket so that I can hug myself.

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  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kickstand View Post
    I think that what pretty much every ham operator out there is going to tell you is that any radio that you get will have a learning curve, so learn to use it before you have to.
    Very true, some radios more so than others. Most of the modern, off the shelf transceivers are pretty straightforward with automatic internal antenna tuners, digital readout etc. But one shouldn't expect to just buy an HF radio to pull out of the Faraday Cage after the fall and expect to able to communicate. Most of the VHF/UHF stuff is very plug and play with programming being the most difficult part.

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