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Kailani Kealoha
06-11-2017, 11:05 PM
I've been doing some researching into options for gardening that won't destroy my knees and found out about raised beds. Apparently they're very common, but I saw some using a lot of corrugated steel to reduce the amount of lumber used. Apparently wood rots within a few years and is more expensive. Anyways, here's one I liked a lot.

https://mycrazygoodlife.com/diy-raised-garden-beds-with-corrugated-metal/

W.Lynn
06-11-2017, 11:24 PM
Usually, folks build them where they plan on staying. Since you mentioned at least one more move, you could save money & let it wait til you're there. Just do it when you get there.

Kailani Kealoha
06-11-2017, 11:59 PM
Yeah, these are post move ideas. There are only 6 more days of school left and then I'm moving. Yay! :)

W.Lynn
06-12-2017, 12:23 AM
I liked the boxes, but think I'd go with a stout design that I could sit on.

redman2006
06-12-2017, 05:37 AM
The steel will rust out especially with fertilizer.

Wood lasted 4 years before we moved and they were still in good shape.

A fast, and maybe cheap depending on location is saw bale construction. When it does rot out after 2 years or so, build the permanent box around it and till the remaining straw and compost in.

In areas like ours with lots of trees, you can thin pine trees and use the whole log for free, just a little labour with the saw and some spikes to hold them.

Filling whatever you do with really good soil may be .ore expensive than the building.

redman2006
06-12-2017, 05:42 AM
Btw, you have children and dogs. That flashing and the tin itself is sharp. Just a thought.

Infidel
06-12-2017, 07:50 AM
I've been doing some researching into options for gardening that won't destroy my knees and found out about raised beds. Apparently they're very common, but I saw some using a lot of corrugated steel to reduce the amount of lumber used. Apparently wood rots within a few years and is more expensive. Anyways, here's one I liked a lot.

https://mycrazygoodlife.com/diy-raised-garden-beds-with-corrugated-metal/

my beds are about 7 years old and the wood is still perfect. I guess it depends on the wood you use. pay a little more for good stuff not the $5 2 x 6 and you should be ok.

Sacajawea
06-12-2017, 11:52 AM
I'm really not a fan of boxes, where you have grass or other weeds growing up to the edge of the box. Maybe for a patio area, and I am considering a few in area that will get designated for that. I'm also going to build fairly deep beds along 2 sides of my (raised to level) parking area. This will end up being kitchen beds for greens, herbs & such that I like to cut fresh. I already have pvc frames to plant over-winter type things in there too. So they'll be fairly deep. I'm repurposing over 100 concrete blocks from the old garden area for those beds. They'll get lined with weed fabric to hold the dirt in.

When I start working on the new garden area (some things can get started this fall) I'll be planning to have beds at ground level, and simply till/dig the beds themselves to be mounded - ie raised enough for 12-18 in of loose growing soil. Low raised beds are actually harder on my back than bending all the way over. The kitchen beds will be probably 3 rows of block high, from the downhill side.

W.Lynn
06-12-2017, 04:14 PM
I re-homed a large pleco this past weekend (great markings, nice fish, just too big for the tank.) Kind of torn between letting the little guys have some more small fish - with the inevitable drama when small fish die - or planting some salad greens. Inside the house does sometimes get a little too warm, but only if the power goes out.

For a raised bed, I might consider bales, but I'd need to stake them down or something, since the only spot for it is on a slight slope. Block construction would also be sturdy, but probably cost considerably more.

Kailani Kealoha
06-12-2017, 10:26 PM
Yeah, maybe just building a couple out of wood would be better. I did some more reading into it and I'm not crazy about galvanized steel near vegetable plants. I'd probably slice a finger off trying to make one anyways. I should see if bamboo could be used. They last forever and are basically free. Maybe drill holes in the ends and use rebar.

W.Lynn
06-13-2017, 02:28 AM
Bamboo would be amazing, it's not toxic, has amazing strength, should hold up reasonably well.

redman2006
06-13-2017, 06:14 AM
I think bamboo is a fabulous idea. I could see it being a little tedious, but for free, yeah. Drive stakes and stack by drilling or build a wood Fram and attach the bamboo inside, or lashings of some really good uv resistant cord, or.......

Heck yeah

W.Lynn
06-13-2017, 12:11 PM
I like the original idea, drill & stake. Those familiar with wood-working will understand if I say to cut all the ends halfway through, for a modified log-cabin style stack. It would be interesting to build.

JJ Homestead
06-28-2017, 09:19 AM
Straw bale gardening would be a viable temporary option, while getting your beds built/established. There are books and websites; perhaps you've already come across some? Some benefits of using straw (or, some people recommend hay--I've tried both, and prefer straw) include fewer weeds and pests, the "raised" aspect you're after, and the following season, you have a surplus of black, fluffy compost to incorporate into your new beds. Heck, there's no reason you can't combine the two techniques. If you have a raised bed 8-12 in. off ground, plus a straw bale in the top, that's another 24 inches: that means less bending. Not sure if back problems, or just knees are the concern, but another resolution would be to invest in a seat for the garden. I plant in the ground, because I don't believe gardening should cost a bundle (like construction fees for raised beds), but I've purchased an inexpensive, light-weight folding stool, which can be easily moved. There are very expensive seats with wheels, molded seats, and built in tool storage, but my thought is they are very heavy and harder to move. Best wishes!!