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Valliam13
09-01-2016, 07:42 PM
So my husband and I want to prep. Should we be buying 2 of EVERYTHING or maybe like he have the 3 day pack since he works away from home and I hold the full on pack since I work from home? I don't know what would be best.

W.Lynn
09-02-2016, 12:10 AM
Start with figuring out what is most likely to cause problems for you. Power outages during wind storms every fall? Flashlights, lanterns, glowsticks, etc. All utilities fail during winter storms? Different set of problems for most of us, but tarps, buckets, shelf-stable foods might help. Need anything special? You might want the exact tool for turning off the gas, or the water, etc.

Valliam13
09-02-2016, 09:53 AM
Well hurricanes mostly as we sit through Hermine. hahaha. We aren't far enough north so other than a few downed power lines and tree limbs, it's all just water and some wind.

We were thinking about want AA wrote about on the home page so we may truly need a BOB sooner rather than later.

WhiteBear620
09-02-2016, 10:16 AM
I think for Get Home Bags, you both should have one. You may work from home, but what if you're in the other town over or visiting family out of town, ect. ?
You've got an advantage when it comes to BOBs in that you can kind of split up the load, maybe only one of you carries the sleeping bag because you can either share it or one sleeps while the other pulls watch (because if it's bad enough that you're using your BOB that may not be a bad idea).
You could also do this with other items, maybe one of your carries the pump water filter but both of you have a lifestraw in your packs; one of you carries one of the canister stove but the other has an Esbit. This way you can spread the weight and bulk around but still have capability just in case you guys get separated for some reason and have to meet up later.

hsehntr98
09-02-2016, 09:23 PM
Those are some good suggestions WB. I wouldn't have thought of doing that, we just loaded both bags almost the same although I think mine has more stuff in it because I do most of the traveling now. Thanks for the ideas.

W.Lynn
09-02-2016, 10:06 PM
Most of us have spent enough time outdoors to think about the rule of threes, redundancy saves lives. I recently gave my husband a set of boot & shoe laces that have small ferro rods for ends, and where some fancy shoes might have a decorator plate of some kind down at the first eyelets, these included a metal plate that could be used for a striker. He loved them. Of course they're made of paracord.

You might see on some forums, or in some of the more preachy books, the simple idea that "2 is 1, 1 is none." Things break, things get lost, things get stolen or confiscated (which I still consider stealing.) So make sure you have alternatives.

Instead of arguing matches vs lighters, have both, and a ferro rod, and learn some primitive fire starting besides, because it's hard to steal knowledge.

Multiple light sources, different types. If you might forget to check batteries, make sure you have some kind of other light, there are currently reusable glow-sticks on the market, and a couple brands of solar-lights similar to the ones you can stick in your yard - but in an inflatable vinyl form. Deflate it, fold it up, not much space taken and you can tie it outside of your pack to charge up while hiking.

Think in threes, and alternatives, and outside the box, and maybe a few other ways.

And pack some flip-flops or moccasins in your pack so you can let your boots dry while you cook, filter & boil water, or other camp chores, your feet will thank you.

Valliam13
09-02-2016, 10:29 PM
YAY for FlippyFloppies!! I'm a FL girl so anything not on my feet is good.. LOL. I'm not an outdoorsy type person. My idea of roughing it is Motel 6. I've never been camping although I was in brownies when I was little and went to a week long camp one summer where we stayed in cabins and it was all nature. That was fun back then (and I mean BACK then).

W.Lynn
09-02-2016, 10:38 PM
Thin, light, and store flat - I tend to get ant bites, so I like moccasins, but anything that keeps you from cutting open your foot on trash or a sharp rock is better than nothing.

KyDave59
09-03-2016, 10:06 AM
My problem has always been that I want to pack too much stuff in a pack. That's not a big problem if it's just going to be riding around in the truck with me. But, when the NEMP/CME happens, and the truck turns into a useless piece of junk, and I have to start carrying the pack, it very well may be too heavy for me (Hey, I am in my mid-50s, and don't have anywhere near the strength nor stamina that I used to have.). So, I'll have to start going through it and discarding things. But, at least I'll have the choice on what to keep and what to discard.

Having said that, it's good to have alternatives. With regards to the lighter and matches scenario, it's good to have both (Heck, I even have an auto-ignite Propane torch in the truck, for those hard to light situations, but I really doubt that I'll be dragging that around with me in the pack if I have to abandon the truck.).

The most important thing you can have is something you can't put in a pack; It's knowledge. And, the way you get knowledge is by training. So, take your pack out, if only for an afternoon, and see what you can and can't accomplish with it. One of the things you may learn, early on, is that "This d*mned thing is too heavy!". But, that's good information. :-) Take it on a hike. Start short, and gradually increase your range. Take a break and open the pack up and see what is useful. Go to different places, different environments, where you have different needs. Consider what if it's raining (It rains way too much in Florida, and in Kentucky, too, for that matter.). Did you include a plastic poncho or rain jacket? What if the sun is shining? Did you include sunscreen? How about a hat? Not only is sunburn painful, it can also be medically dangerous.

Dave

Dave

BlueWolf
09-03-2016, 11:10 AM
I like the idea of the short hikes with a new pack. There are several small parks around me that I can walk through and my fat butt not get too overwhelmed to check out my load configuration. As I work 20+ miles from home and have to cross two rivers to get home, my bag has to support me for at least an overnight hike home. I don't include any cooking gear, but multiple water carrying containers and filter options, change of clothes, and basic weather/nav/comm/med gear. Matching pack for my wife in her car as she works a few miles from me (in the right direction to get home!) so I don't have to worry about carrying too much extra gear to meet her needs.

KyDave59
09-03-2016, 12:19 PM
I like the idea of using Chlorine bleach (e.g,. Clorox or Purex) to purify water, after filtration, of course. Thus, I've stockpiled several gallons of Clorox at home, and have a small bottle in the truck.

http://www.healthlinkbc.ca/healthfiles/hfile49b.stm

http://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/EmergencyPreparednessandResponse/Factsheets/WaterPurification

My uncle lived on a farm without commercial water, so he would collect rain water, or use well water (which contained quite a bit of Hydrogen Sulfide, giving it that "rotten egg" smell; It was safe to drink, if you could get past the smell.). To prevent water borne diseases, he would treat the water with Clorox. He did that for 20+ years, until the county finally got a water line out to his place. He's still going strong.

redman2006
09-03-2016, 01:35 PM
Where do you get moccasins now days? Not the slippers sold at a shoe store, but some that would actually work for camp or even hiking? My ability at leather craft would leave me better off bare foot I am afraid, but it is something I should learn.

Valliam13
09-03-2016, 01:57 PM
I keep trying to get a job at my husband's work but he tells me I don't want to work in that circus. I just want to see him more often. So he would probably need the majority of stuff as I'm usually never farther than 5 miles from home.

Would it make better sense to carry multiple platypus bags instead of 1 platypus and a few canteens??

kickstand
09-03-2016, 05:02 PM
I like the idea of using Chlorine bleach (e.g,. Clorox or Purex) to purify water, after filtration, of course. Thus, I've stockpiled several gallons of Clorox at home, and have a small bottle in the truck.

http://www.healthlinkbc.ca/healthfiles/hfile49b.stm

http://www.doh.wa.gov/Emergencies/EmergencyPreparednessandResponse/Factsheets/WaterPurification
...


Don't forget that liquid bleach breaks down. As I understand it, it really starts loosing effectiveness after about a year or so. Of course, storage location and method effect how rapidly it turns to salt and water.

WhiteBear620
09-03-2016, 07:08 PM
Where do you get moccasins now days? Not the slippers sold at a shoe store, but some that would actually work for camp or even hiking? My ability at leather craft would leave me better off bare foot I am afraid, but it is something I should learn.

Here's a traditional moccasin company, price is a little steep. I'm trying to go back to barefoot (I have flat feet), so I use something a little more modern
https://www.amazon.com/TF-BK30-KG_300-Tesla-Running-Minimalist-Barefoot/dp/B01F1KAZVC/ref=sr_1_1?s=apparel&ie=UTF8&qid=1472947642&sr=1-1&nodeID=7141123011&keywords=tesla+shoes
I can fit these shoes in my pocket if I needed to, very flexible and lightweight.

Sacajawea
09-03-2016, 07:30 PM
Gee, there are still lots of places to buy moccasins - if you can't make your own. Now, they might cost more than you expect... but making shoes is a good SHTF skill.

W.Lynn
09-03-2016, 09:20 PM
Mocs are easy, but plan on learning to tan leather. Though make-do sandles can be whipped up in a jiffy from all kinds of things.

BlueWolf
09-04-2016, 03:45 PM
I keep trying to get a job at my husband's work but he tells me I don't want to work in that circus. I just want to see him more often. So he would probably need the majority of stuff as I'm usually never farther than 5 miles from home.

Would it make better sense to carry multiple platypus bags instead of 1 platypus and a few canteens??


I have one 1qt canteen for external carry and a 2 qt Platypus bag carried in the GHB. I figure that's enough for me for a day-and-a-half trek home in the Southern heat. I also have a Sawyer Mini filter but don't really expect to use it. I keep almost a full case of water at work at all times so will have plenty to fill my canteen & Platypus if I have to walk home without worrying about finding clean water.

For an INCH bag, I have a second Platypus bag for the filtration process. That's where I plan on using the Sawyer Mini filter. Water will be a primary concern, but also weighs a lot when carrying it for long treks.

Valliam13
09-04-2016, 10:03 PM
We went shopping today.. hehehe. What is INCH?

WhiteBear620
09-04-2016, 10:48 PM
I'm Never Coming Home bag.

Cwi555
09-07-2016, 01:16 PM
Gee, there are still lots of places to buy moccasins - if you can't make your own. Now, they might cost more than you expect... but making shoes is a good SHTF skill.

I can make something sturdy that won't fall apart or kill my feet, but a fashion statement they are not. The words 'butt ugly' apply to my efforts thus far.

Graywolf
09-07-2016, 07:23 PM
I have an article on that right here. It doesn't tell you everything but it may give you some ideas.

Family Survival: 5 Tips for Distributing Gear (http://graywolfsurvival.com/452776/family-survival-5-tips-for-distributing-gear/)

bnorr79
09-10-2016, 06:51 AM
I could give you a list of things in my pack. You'd all think I was insane. I've got socks and boxers, and batteries and a solar charger, to wet wipes, to magazines for my rifle, that's also in my car. . Unless I happen to be on a trip out of town, 20 miles is the furthest I'll ever have to walk from the nearest city. I'll do that in a couple days depending on situation and how I'm able to travel. Pack your bag heavy, let the car carry it. You can always dump things that you may not need depending on the situation.

KyDave59
09-10-2016, 08:19 AM
Don't forget toilet paper. Even in a non-SHTF scenario, toilet paper is very good to have. I've had to use my supply while being on the back of the farm, or on a neighbor's farm. After all, when you hear the call of nature, you have to respond. ;-) The "industrial" type is usually better to carry than the fancy soft stuff.

As for shoes, I've seen some designs made using cut-up automotive tires. Those require a substantial amount of work to produce, and it's better to use the aramid fiber ones than the steel fiber ones. They'll be heavy, but they'll protect your feet against stepping on things. If one thinks ahead, you can make replacement tire soles which strap to your normal shoes before they've worn out.

The socks and undies are a good idea. Trench foot is a very real possibility, and will stop you from making progress. Crotch-rot isn't much fun, either. The wet-wipes are a good idea (I probably need to replace my canister of them; they do dry out.). The batteries and solar charger are good, as long as a NEMP doesn't take out the equipment that they're used in (Hmm, would a NEMP zap an LED flashlight? Don't know.).

As for the magazines and rifle, I prefer a revolver, usually in .22 caliber, and usually in stainless steel. It's lighter weight than a rifle, and functions reliably, even when dirty. I can carry 100 rounds for it with almost no weight penalty. Just make sure you have the appropriate license/permit for it before the SHTF time.

Dave