PDA

View Full Version : Bug out radio



Sean Meador
02-29-2016, 04:35 PM
I've got a need for a crank or solar powered radio for my pack. Something like Morgan uses in the latest book. Do any of you have experience with a radio that won't break the bank but won't fail me when I decide to use it? I was hoping to stay somewhen in the sub $100 range. Preferably around $50. Thanks

angeryamerican
02-29-2016, 09:28 PM
I don't have much experience with the crank radios. I use one from County Comm and rechargeable batteries. I keep a Goal Zero charger to keep the batteries charged.

Sean Meador
03-01-2016, 01:13 PM
I don't have much experience with the crank radios. I use one from County Comm and rechargeable batteries. I keep a Goal Zero charger to keep the batteries charged.

That's a good idea too. I'll look into them. Thanks bud.

ADV1
04-04-2016, 11:41 AM
I just bought this today... http://www.countycomm.com/gp5ssb.html still need a solar set up for recharging but this is a good deal...

Kailani Kealoha
04-04-2016, 10:04 PM
Not 100% sure but if you're asking about the am/fm/shortwave type, I have an old Grundig one for camping out and power outages. It even has a flashlight. Go figure that it's the bulb type though. You bump it and it burns out.

chris0013
04-08-2016, 07:26 PM
Can those County Comm radios transmit? Looking at everything I can find on them on the internet and it never says it can.

kickstand
04-08-2016, 11:02 PM
I think that you will find that they are a receiver only.

Job
04-09-2016, 01:35 PM
Correct. RCV only.

chris0013
04-17-2016, 01:35 PM
What were the 2 way radios that Sarge hooked Morgan and Thad up with?

angeryamerican
04-17-2016, 07:18 PM
If you're looking for decent handhelds take a look at Hytera. I'll have a video coming on some here soon.

kickstand
04-17-2016, 09:28 PM
If I remember right, they were the Yaesu FT857, a very nice Ham radio capable of going portable with external batteries and producing up to 100 watts of transmitted power.

7544

That's a really nice rig. They run about $800 or so, and you do need an Amateur Radio License of at least a General class to really use it.

kickstand
04-18-2016, 08:04 PM
Oops, I lied. One rig was the FT857D and one was an FT817ND, which puts out 5 watts of transmitted power, but has the advantage of having an integrated NiMH battery pack. Again, a General class Amateur license is needed for proper use.

The both rigs are "All-Mode" rigs, meaning that not only will it handle HF for long range comms, it will also do UHF and VHF for more localized comms.

Here's the FT817ND

7562

junior125
04-18-2016, 08:47 PM
you could use a 817/857 type radio but legally only on 10m in a very short band range, as Kick said the only way to get full use of it is being a General class license

kickstand
04-23-2016, 10:05 AM
And a quick note for the newer folks. When "Going Home" was first being written, one of our friends (AD) supplied a lot, if not all of the ham radio information. As more folks started asking questions, he started a website dedicated to helping new preppers get their ham radio license. This is the reason that there is no "Comms" section here on www.angeryamerican.net . His website is www.preparedham.com . If you're interested in comms post SHTF, that would be a great place to start.

W.Lynn
04-25-2016, 09:51 AM
To supplement the info Kickstand offered, there ARE helpful posts about FRS/GRMS, MURS, CB, and CB/FRS/GRMS base stations for the pessimists who feel they will never pass HAM license tests. Though if the fairly frequent pre-teen (even sone rare 6 & 7 year olds,) can do it, we can probably get anyone here through it. The big trick is getting the people you want to be able to talk to, to care enough to also do it.

Still working on my family members in Corpus Christi and in Wyoming.

Hobes
04-26-2016, 09:50 PM
if you looking for AM FM Shortwave, hand crank and solar, I have one of these, they work for me out bush..
http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Voyager-V1-AM-FM-Shortwave-Emergency-Radio-with-Solar-and-Hand-Crank-Green-/191680503875?hash=item2ca10c6043:g:dmUAAOxy4dNS09I h

snake6264
09-05-2016, 08:11 AM
Grundig yacht boy Shortwave weather am fm batteries last forever in mine

Gspotts
12-13-2017, 02:55 PM
Ok thanks for that info, I have a good 12vdc Shortwave radio but its a full sized table sized radio I do travel and would like a good portable SW receiver a County Comm radio. I'm not the one that ask if a County Comm radio could transmit I have long believed that monitoring the air waves was better, walking around looking for flash lights in the dark, it is alway better not to be guy holding the flash light just aim for the flash light. My philosophy is first, 4-6 100 or 200 channel scanners each watching different frequencies. Second monitor all the common bands like CB, Ham, FRS, GMRS, Marine, I do want the ability to transmit on these however that is not a priority. I might use that to give false info to looter, but I wouldn't stay on the air very long. I will most likely buy a County Comm radio.

gaijinpunk
01-28-2018, 09:45 PM
Hey Kick,

Wanted to check out the info there, but preparedham.com seems to be gone?

survivedall
01-29-2018, 02:36 AM
Try http://www.preparedham.com/forums/

junior125
01-29-2018, 07:39 PM
They're going through a server migration so bear with em

kickstand
01-29-2018, 09:29 PM
If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask here. We do still consider www.preparedham.com our "comms section", but we also have a lot of old tube benders here that can answer most questions.

medicmike
01-29-2018, 10:40 PM
They're going through a server migration so bear with em

Been a member over there for a while but not active. Yes they are going through a server migration so may be spotty for a bit.

medicmike
01-30-2018, 06:08 AM
For a bugout transceiver something like this might be useful http://www.mfjenterprises.com/Product.php?productid=MFJ-9440 One will be hard pressed to find a cheaper HF transiever but you would be limited to one band and no digital tuning. I'm sure there would be a learning curve to operating it...something like this will not be plug and play. In my home station I run a Yaesu FT-990 with the MARS mod so I have the ability to transmit from the high end of the AM broadcast band up to the 10 meter band. It also makes a dandy shortwave receiver. It is 12v but too big and heavy to be considered a bugout radio.

apache235
01-30-2018, 08:41 AM
I have an Elecraft KX 3 which covers everything from the 160m to 6m, weighs a little over a pound and can TX & Rc SSB, CW, AM, FM and yes it has a learning curve on which I've only started. Power is 10W unless plugged in (AC or battery pack) then it's 15W. It can be hooked up to a 100W amplifier but now you are talking mostly a static use.

kickstand
01-30-2018, 09:08 AM
I think that what pretty much every ham operator out there is going to tell you is that any radio that you get will have a learning curve, so learn to use it before you have to.

medicmike
01-30-2018, 11:29 AM
I think that what pretty much every ham operator out there is going to tell you is that any radio that you get will have a learning curve, so learn to use it before you have to.

Very true, some radios more so than others. Most of the modern, off the shelf transceivers are pretty straightforward with automatic internal antenna tuners, digital readout etc. But one shouldn't expect to just buy an HF radio to pull out of the Faraday Cage after the fall and expect to able to communicate. Most of the VHF/UHF stuff is very plug and play with programming being the most difficult part.