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Red Sonja
08-14-2014, 09:58 PM
If you purchase a bunker, how do you know that the ones who install it will not disclose your location to unwanted parties (either unintentionally or otherwise)? Due to safety concerns, would it be allowed or impractical to install a purchased bunker by yourself? Would it be better to purchase the walls etc. from the company and just assemble it yourself via welding etc.? But when I think of the technology available via satellite etc., are bunkers mainly for hiding from civil unrest instead of corrupt authority? Am I wearing the tinfoil too tightly? Any thoughts are appreciated. Thanks.

AD
08-14-2014, 10:53 PM
Easy. You shoot them after they bury it :wow1:

Tex
08-14-2014, 11:31 PM
Buy from a reputable company who makes and sells bunkers. If the SHTF though, all bets are off.

Are you thinking of buying a bunker? Why not just get a shipping container? They are cheap and weatherproof.


Tex

MillenniumMan
08-15-2014, 07:06 AM
Easy. You shoot them after they bury it :wow1:

And bury them afterwards. :)

Most companies that build bunkers also do in-house installs, and those employees sign NDA's. FWIW after a major collapse, it may not matter. But most of those guys have access to a bunker anyways.

As Tex stated, get an iso box, 40 feet long and rent a backhoe. There's plenty of how-to videos and docs out there that can show you.

P.S. Tar the whole thing before you bury it, it'll save you from having an underground swimming pool.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=poj_-vDaAHI


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U6ShrYIBMmU

Or if things get out of hand:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aG13knBVVqY&list=PL408588774B88EE5C

Red Sonja
08-15-2014, 04:47 PM
Buy from a reputable company who makes and sells bunkers. If the SHTF though, all bets are off.

Are you thinking of buying a bunker? Why not just get a shipping container? They are cheap and weatherproof.


Tex

But I thought shipping containers collapsed & are not advisable. I think I read that in one of Graywolf's posts. (were used in military temporarily & they collapsed) :confused:

Tex
08-15-2014, 06:03 PM
RS, I was being a smartass seeing if anyone would bite.

Never Ever bury a shipping container. They are in no way designed to take the load.

One thing a person could do is build some precast concrete sheets with ample thickness and reenforcement. Dig into the side of a hill and make a sorta rootcellar on steriods. There are things one needs to do in order for this to work, but I didn't want to go into that great of detail. This is a cheaper and fairly easy option for people with a little construction experience.


Tex

redman2006
08-15-2014, 07:21 PM
As bunkers or as cabins they collapsed? I have seen some pretty neat homes built from shipping containers, but I have no idea how they did long term.

W.Lynn
08-15-2014, 10:10 PM
As cabins, sheds, etc, they work. I think collapsing comes into the picture because folks bury them with no additional bracing or support of any kind, and forget about the forces involved in the weight of loose soil & rock they are using to backfill with (or worse, it might all be loose with lots of heavy rock.)

I'm pretty sure there are engineers just for that sort of thing. But there are also well-engineered things that can be used where other things won't work - preformed concrete culverts and tanks meant for in-ground uses. Many of those led to the popular models of tornado shelters on the market.

MillenniumMan
08-16-2014, 06:29 AM
There are a few that have been buried with documentation in the public domain. Maybe a follow-up to see how they've fared?

RD
08-16-2014, 06:42 AM
Shipping containers extremely strong at the corners, they are designed to be stacked 4 to 8 high during shipping voyages. To bury one you would want to reinforce the roof and walls. Welding additional braces would make one strong enough to bury, maybe bury it partially like a berm home.



RD

redman2006
08-16-2014, 07:27 AM
I have been curious about these as a cabin for a while. One of my concerns was snow load with the flat roof. How would you go about finding out what the load could be?

RD
08-16-2014, 08:33 AM
red- i don't see you having an issue. those things sit in rail yards and lots all winter long here.


RD

AD
08-16-2014, 12:39 PM
Erect a sloped roof on it if its an issue

redman2006
08-16-2014, 01:08 PM
Ad, to me, the fascination with these containers is keeping them simple and cheap, so adding a roof is something I would rather not do. Also, I have a plan in mind that would us portions as outdoor areas for patios and such, so I would rather not if possible.

Long ways down the road though.

AD
08-16-2014, 02:11 PM
Was just suggesting that if snow loads were a concern, a simple roof at a 45 deg angle could take care of that and give you storage at the same time, but I did not say that did I......

redman2006
08-16-2014, 04:19 PM
Ad, it is a good suggestion. It just does not quite fit what I would like to do.

Some time ago I found a company that would make all the cuts for doors and windows according to your plan. They would then deliver them to a prepared site and do the rough assembly that requires heavy equip.ent. you were on your own after that. The fees were not bad at all.

RD
08-16-2014, 04:58 PM
red- the roof will with stand a winter, in the lower 48 any how. Shipping containers strongest points are there corners because of how they are stacked for shipment. single free standing on the ground they will weather just fine. If you choose to bury one, I would reinforce the roof and sides.


RD

redman2006
08-16-2014, 05:30 PM
No intention of that. I do wonder how they will handle wind or a tornado compared to stick built?

RD
08-17-2014, 04:37 AM
No intention of that. I do wonder how they will handle wind or a tornado compared to stick built?

Probably just like a mobile home would.

RD

AD
08-17-2014, 01:08 PM
I bet if held down correctly it would withstand the winds of a tornado and stay put, but would have a hard time dealing with wind driven projectiles.

Tex
08-17-2014, 01:42 PM
On industrial jobsites, we always called them a "Conex". I have heard them called all kinds of names, but they are all talking about the same thing. I was on a job in Indian a few years ago when some freak weather hit and nobody was sure if it was a microburst, straight line winds or a tornado. Being as we were in a depression or bowl, it was hard to tell. It looked like hell afterward and stuff was strewn around like a tornado had hit.

Several of the conexes were thrown around and rolled over and some of the emptier ones went to rolling across the site like they were round instead of square. The containers that were full of materials or tools stayed put and didn't budge. They empty ones though were no match for Mother Nature. Had they been anchored down though, they would have done fine, probably.

The main thing we noticed when we went to put everything back into place was the doors were all sprung and would not seal closed. As they were being tossed about, they twisted from one end to the other pretty bad. They shorter 20 footers weren't in nearly as bad of shape as the longer 40 footers. The only strongpoints are on the corners where they can be stacked and have no structural integrity to give strength from end to the other.

There were several that had steel either wedged through the 1/8" skin or holes where steel went all the way through. We were about half completed with the skeleton on a bag house and the steel was only hot bolted at that time. When the high winds hit, bolts started snapping and the structure almost fell completely over. Luckily some bracing held it, but alot of the steel on top came crashing down. Of course the bigger stuff went right through the conex skin, but I was surprised to see some 1"x1" angle iron go right through as well. It acted like a missile. Even structural bolts that fell left some very huge dents.

The metal on conexes is only about 1/8" thick and won't stand up to much. The ribs bent into the skin is the only sort of bracing that keep a conex from being flimsy. They will not stand much of a load against anywhere but the corners.

Around here, there are several train crossings with big galvanized culverts going under the tracks for vehicles to pass through. Some are almost 15ft across and can take the load of earth over the top and around the sides and also several trains a day going over them. I have seen several ads on craigslist lately where people are selling some of the bigger 8 and 10ft culverts for people to make underground shelters and bunkers.


Tex

reddawnspokane
08-17-2014, 09:21 PM
I wholheartedly expected to be called dumbass for this. But what about these steel structure bunkers:
http://www.risingsbunkers.com/pricing-and-floor-plans/

W.Lynn
08-18-2014, 01:12 PM
rds, I love sites like that. Wish I had a bunch'a millions of dollars and could have something custom done to fit the whole family, clan, and tribe into.

RD
08-18-2014, 06:53 PM
http://www.underground-homes.com/underground-house.htm

RD

Graywolf
08-19-2014, 07:57 AM
I just updated the article with some pics of a bunker that someone buried under only 18" of dirt several years ago. It didn't fare too well.

http://graywolfsurvival.com/2625/why-you-shouldnt-bury-a-shipping-container-for-a-shtf-bunker/