Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Storm Damage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northeast Texas
    Posts
    434
    Thanks
    654
    Thanked 598 Times in 270 Posts

    Storm Damage

    In the aftermath of the line of storms that moved through the area last night, I discovered our Bradford Pear tree had lost some big limbs. Luckily the limbs mostly missed the greenhouse, but a couple of small limbs buckled a few Lexan roof panels. A friend and I got out this afternoon and cut up the downed limbs, but now I'm stuck with a split tree that'll be difficult/impossible to patch and save.

    Greenhouse.jpg

    Greenhouse 1.jpg

    Split Tree.jpg

    Any suggestions for saving the tree? Or is it time to make firewood and plant a new one?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    In an Undisclosed Remote Location in the tropical South East
    Posts
    415
    Thanks
    348
    Thanked 557 Times in 266 Posts
    I can't swear to a pear tree but I've had several harwoods and countless evergreens survive worse than that. That is a magnificent pear tree if it is producing I'd clean up the break to make sure it can't hold water and treat it with an insect repellent till it can grow callus tissue and heal itself (don't paint or seal it) a tree that size that is generally healthy should be able the heal itself within a year or two.
    Oderint dum metuant

    "Stay with me; do not fear. For he who seeks my life seeks your life, but with me you shall be safe. 1 Samuel 22:23

  3. The Following User Says Thank You to 0utlaw For This Useful Post:


  4. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northeast Texas
    Posts
    434
    Thanks
    654
    Thanked 598 Times in 270 Posts
    Bradford Pear is an ornamental, non-fruitbearing tree. Excellent shade, but not worth much for anything else.

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    2,678
    Thanks
    1,626
    Thanked 3,870 Times in 1,543 Posts
    I have seen the way people butcher the Bradford pears here, and they o ly come back stronger.

    I would try to salvage it. We ran a bolt trough the tree with large flat washer and trimmed it all back. You have to trim it so it can't hold water. I am sure it shortened the life, but 12 years later, it was still growing .

  6. The Following User Says Thank You to redman2006 For This Useful Post:


  7. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    2,678
    Thanks
    1,626
    Thanked 3,870 Times in 1,543 Posts
    Btw, Bradford pear makes great mild smoker wood in my opinion. If you have to cut it down, use it on some turkeys.

  8. The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to redman2006 For This Useful Post:


  9. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northeast Texas
    Posts
    434
    Thanks
    654
    Thanked 598 Times in 270 Posts
    Quote Originally Posted by redman2006 View Post
    Btw, Bradford pear makes great mild smoker wood in my opinion. If you have to cut it down, use it on some turkeys.
    Even not cutting it down, the broken limbs would provide enough wood to smoke a couple of hundred turkeys. I'll hang onto some of it just because you said so.

  10. The Following User Says Thank You to olfart For This Useful Post:


  11. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    Vado, NM
    Posts
    5,305
    Thanks
    12,694
    Thanked 13,655 Times in 3,935 Posts
    Ok, I'm ignorant when it comes to this. What do you mean about "not holding water", and why?
    Someday I'm going to pull my life together. But that day is not today. Today I'm driving a stolen police car.

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Northeast Texas
    Posts
    434
    Thanks
    654
    Thanked 598 Times in 270 Posts
    Water hastens wood rot. A concave injury in a tree trunk, especially if it's splintered wood, will catch and retain water until the water either evaporates or seeps out through cracks. If the wood in the injury can be smoothed over so that water can't stand in it, but rather runs off, there will be less likelihood of rot.

    I've tried to smooth the hole in our tree, but the splintered wood inside the recess is hard to get to. I may try grinding it out with the tip of the chainsaw tomorrow and see if I can get it a little smoother.

  13. The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to olfart For This Useful Post:


  14. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    michigan ,saginaw area
    Posts
    2,187
    Thanks
    1,947
    Thanked 2,821 Times in 1,264 Posts
    I've covered some wounds with pruning spray that will cover it until the tree can start healing . Have seen some people use cement but not fond of that one lol .

  15. The Following User Says Thank You to airdrop For This Useful Post:


Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •