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Thread: where is farming going

  1. #1
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    where is farming going

    As things look after reviewing this https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GP4Sajaa4t4 it may be rough . As weather change will the farmer have the money to change with it . If farm equipment companies tighten up it may be harder for farmers to make older equipment last longer . Mmmmmm

    I try to bring thought provoking info that will allow you to look at the what if and how you might need to prepare yourselves . A lot of things bearing down on us but have a plan .

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  3. #2
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    I think everyone knows what my opinion is on farming/gardening! I think everyone should tear up their yards and at least grow a little. if for whatever reason they cannot grow anything at all I would say get with local farmers or co ops-something to support and help expand local farmers or market gardeners. Food sourcing has got to start being a little more local.
    Daughter of a Ghost Town.

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  5. #3
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    Taters, radishes, lettuce, cabbage onions in the group d this week end. Peas will he before dark on Sunday too. Scary stuff.

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  7. #4
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    With rise in inflation, climate change and economy going down the drain, farming is the most affected sector. It is a scary thought to think what our kids are gonna eat in 20-25 years from now.

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  9. #5
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    Even scarier in our corner of the world is the lack of rain. This is normally our rainy season. We got 0.4" of rain last night, 1.5" for November, and less for October. 30 years ago we were getting 3 - 4" per event, 48 - 54" per year. Now we're down to well below half that annual rainfall.

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  11. #6
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    Permaculture and terraforming even in a small way to utilize land in the best and most productive way is important. It is my opinion (and that of a lot of gardeners and permaculturists) that we must get away from the typical monoculture model of rows of one or 2 crops. This also means getting back into growing foods that were natural to our region. We must consider food forests, Permaculture, perennials, composting, different ways of watering like olla pots, etc. This takes a paradigm shift in how we look at local food production. The solution is not in what food producers are doing now. (save for the smaller gardens/etc.)
    I am constantly trying new grains or beans and perennials. Some work, some don't. But now is the time to get out there and experiment. Don't wait to bust out the seed cache on the 'day of'. We are in a slow decline in terms of healthy food production and need to act now.

    If you don't like the heavy duty permaculture stuff read Rick Austin's 'Secret garden of survival' book. Or check out David the Good's older videos on survival gardening. He has great books and they are very cheap.
    Daughter of a Ghost Town.

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